Portfolio Guidelines

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PORTFOLIO GUIDELINES FOR NATIONAL CERTIFICATE (VOCATIONAL) The Gauteng Department of Education has developed these Portfolio Guidelines as a resource for college lecturers and students. The guidelines are also intended to establish a standard for portfolio assessment in the province. Assessment requirements related to the NC(V) qualifications are stipulated in the following national policy documents: • National policy regarding Further Education and Training programmes: Approval of the documents, policy for the National Certificates (Vocational): Qualifications at Levels 2 to 4 on the National Qualifications Framework (NQF)[1] • National Certificates (Vocational) Subject Guidelines • National Certificates (Vocational) Assessment Guidelines[2]; and National policy regarding Further Education and Training programmes: Approval of the document: national policy on the conduct, administration and management of the assessment on the National Certificates (Vocational)[3]. The national policy documents provide the ultimate prescriptions for NC(V) assessment, and these Guidelines are intended to highlight and supplement these prescriptions in order to facilitate implementation of assessment of (NC(V in the province and in the colleges. The process of development of portfolio guidelines for the different subjects has involved a large team of subject experts from the colleges, including both moderators and lecturer. Their participation constitutes an invaluable contribution to the process. Section A Portfolios 1. DEFINITION OF A PORTFOLIO A portfolio (PoE) is an ongoing systematic collection of evidence that demonstrates milestones in a student’s journey towards mastery, comprehension, application, and synthesis of a given set of concepts. It serves as a summary of the student’s progress in an academic learning or career environment. A portfolio makes use of a variety of items that serve as evidence that the student has achieved the required outcomes, and is evaluated by college assessors. The content of the portfolios should be created within realistic and appropriate college contexts relating directly to the NC(V) standard. 2. PURPOSE OF A PORTFOLIO The overall purpose of the preparation of a portfolio is for the student to demonstrate and provide evidence of mastery of a given set of learning objectives. Portfolios are typically personalized, long-term representations of the student’s own efforts and achievements. Whereas multiple choice tests are designed to determine what a student does not know, portfolio assessments emphasize what the student does know and can do[4]. The portfolio includes the process followed in order to deliver a defined product corresponding to pre-established outcomes. The portfolio process improves the learning experience by encouraging self-evaluation. Portfolios are most appropriate when students need to integrate a number of ideas, procedures, and relationships. 3. PRINCIPLES OF PORTFOLIO DEVELOPMENT Portfolio activities must be designed so that lecturers can make accurate, fair and reasonable decisions based on the requirements as articulated in the Assessment Guidelines. • Portfolio tasks must comply with prescriptions in the Assessment Guidelines. • Portfolio tasks must be clearly formulated to correspond to the criteria of the NC(V) Assessment Standards. • Items of student work and achievement must be carefully selected for their relationship to the Subject Outcomes and Learning Outcomes as contained in the NC(V) assessment guidelines. • The portfolio must provide an authentic and realistic representation of the achievements of the student. • The evidence selected for the portfolio must indicate a realistic context. Portfolios must be arranged strictly according to the layout and order requirements to facilitate an easy moderation process. 4. GUIDELINES FOR DEVELOPING PORTFOLIOS FOR NC(V) Portfolios of Evidence (PoEs) must contain all internal continuous assessment (ICASS) evidence, which must be readily available for monitoring, moderation and verification purposes. The internal continuous assessment practical component is undertaken in a real workplace, a workshop or a “structured environment”. This component is moderated internally and externally quality assured by Umalusi. Portfolios can be used successfully in courses with large enrolments provided there is a portfolio infrastructure for students and lecturers to use. Most importantly, the format of each item in the portfolio needs to be similar, and the arrangement of the portfolios overall must be the same. This is particularly relevant for the process of moderation. All evidence collected for assessment purposes is kept or recorded in the student’s Portfolio of Evidence. The PoE includes practical and written components. The marks allocated to assessment tasks completed during the year, kept and recorded in the Portfolios of Evidence account for 50% of the student’s final mark f Vocational subjects and 25% for Fundamental subjects, with the balance of the total mark coming from an external examination. [5] The internal continuous assessment (ICASS) must be re-submitted with each examination enrolment for which it constitutes a component. 5. COMPOSITION OF PORTFOLIOS FOR NCV The NCV portfolios should consist of the following: A. Lecturers’ Portfolios 1. Cover page indicating: • College and campus, with campus contact details • Full names of lecturer • Learning programme • Subject and NQF level • Year 2. Table of contents 3. Personal details of lecturer 4. Working mark sheet for the subject: Record of achievement per class, level or unit. 5. Moderation feedback 6. Year Plan and Work Schedule 7. College Subject Assessment Plan and Formal Schedule of Assessment The assessment plan indicates which Subject Outcomes and Assessment Standards will be assessed, what assessment method or activity will be used and when this assessment will be conducted. 8. Assessment tasks, and tools for the assessment of each task • Theory and Practical tasks ­ Description of task and instructions to students ­ Assessment instruments to be used for each task ­ Recording sheets for students’ marks for each task ­ Completed records of evidence for each student for the task ­ Record of feedback to student for the task 9. Supporting documentation • Minutes • Reports, etc • College Assessment Policy • Subject Assessment Guidelines • Subject Guidelines 5a Lecturer Portfolio Exemplars Section 1: Title Page - Exemplar [pic] College Lecturer’s Portfolio of Assessment Name of Lecturer: ______________________________________ Learning Programme: [Insert Programme name] Subject: _____________________________________ NQF Level: ________________ Year: [Insert year] Address: Tel: Section 2: Table of Contents - Exemplar Table of Contents 1. Title page 2. Table of Contents 3. Personal details of lecturer 4. Working mark sheet for the subject 5. Moderation feedback 6. Year Plan and Work Schedule 7. College Subject Assessment Plan and Formal Schedule of Assessment 8. Assessment tasks and tools for the assessment of each task Theory and Practical tasks: Description of task and instructions to students • Assessment instruments to be used for each task • Recording sheets for students’ marks for each task • Completed records of evidence for each student for the task • Record of feedback to student for the task 9. Supporting documentation • Meeting minutes • Reports • College Assessment Policy • DoE/ GDE Assessment Plan • Subject Guidelines • Subject Assessment Guidelines • National Policy on the Conduct, Administration and Management of the Assessment of the National Certificates Vocational (NCV) • Policy for the National Certificates (Vocational): Qualifications at Levels 2 to 4 on the National Qualifications Framework (NQF) Section 3: Personal Details of Lecturer - Exemplar Personal details of lecturer Full name of lecturer: …………………………………………………………………………… Contact details: ……………………………………………………………………………....... ID Number: ………………………………………………………………………………... SACE registration number: ……………………………………………………………………... Assessor registration number: ……………………………………………………………………................... Moderator registration number: …………………………………………………………………..................... Section 4: Working mark sheet for the subject - Exemplar |…………….. FET College | |………………. Campus | |Gauteng Department of Education | |SUMMARY OF ASSESSMENTS MARKSHEET (PoE) | |Subject: | |Level: | | |Nr. | |Theory |Total Practical |Total |Grand | | | |(Tests & Assignments) |(Theory) | |(Prac) |TOTAL | | |Date | |Learning Programme: | | |Subject: | | |Level: |Assessment Task Number: | |Topics covered: | | |Subject Outcomes & Learning Outcomes: | | |Integration: | | |Date of issue: |Submission date: | Scale of achievement (delete the inapplicable scale, and adapt to the needs of the task) |RATING Code |7 |6 |5 |4 |3 | |RATING |Outstanding |Highly competent |Competent |Not yet competent |Not achieved | |MARKS % |80-100 |70-79 |50-69 |40-49 |0-39 | |Feedback to student: | | | Signatures |Assessor: |Student: |Moderator | |Date: |Date: |Date: | [pic] Cover page for assessment tools Name of assessor: | | |Learning Programme: | | |Subject: | | |Level: |Assessment Task Number: | |Integration: | | |Instructions to assessor: | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | 5bStudent Portfolio Dividers should be used to separate the sections having different headings below. 1. Cover page indicating: • College and campus • Full names and surname of student • Contact details of student • ID number of student • Learning programme • Subject and NQF level • Year of training (e. g. 2005, or 2006, or 2005/2006) 2. Table of contents 3. Personal details (including certified copy of student ID) 4. Declaration of Authenticity 5. Assessment record sheet 6. Evidence - ICASS • Evidence Section A - Theory • Evidence Section B - Practical • Evidence Section C - CAT 7. Supplementary documents Student Portfolio Exemplars Section 1:Title page - Exemplar [pic] Student’s Portfolio of Evidence Full names of student: _________________________________ ID number: _________________________________ Contact details: _________________________________ College and campus: _________________________________ Learning Programme: [Insert Programme name] Subject and level: _____________________________________ Year: [Insert year] Lecturer: _____________________________________ Section 2:Table of Contents - Exemplar Table of Contents 1. Title page 2. Table of Contents 3. Personal details of student 4. Declaration of Authenticity . Assessment record sheet 6. Evidence – ICASS • Evidence Section A - Theory • Evidence Section B – Practical • Evidence Section C – CAT 7. Supplementary documentation Section 3: Personal details of student - Exemplar Personal details of student Surname:………………………………………………………………………………............................... First names: ……………………………………………………………………………............ ID Number: ………………………………………………………………………………......... Contact details: ……………………………………………………………………................................ Postal address: ……………………………………………………………………................................ Physical address: …………………………………………………………………................................... Last school attended: …………………………………………………………………........................ Highest grade passed: …………………………………………………………………........................ Special needs and medical conditions: ………………………………………………………............. Contact details of parent or guardian: ………………………………………………………............. Lecturer: ............................................................................. ..................... Section 4: Declaration of Authenticity - Exemplar Declaration of Authenticity Compilation of Portfolio I, ……………………………………………………………………….. (full name) (ID No) ………………………………………………………………… hereby solemnly declare that: 1. I am fully aware of and understand 2. I agree to 3. I am acquainted with the provision and requirements for the compilation of the student portfolio. All the work and evidence provided is my original work. 4. I am fully aware of the serious consequences that may result from any breach or infringement of the above instructions. 5. I undertake to take full responsibility for the compilation, safety and security of the portfolio whilst it is in my care. Signature of Student: Name of Campus: ………………………………. Place: …………………………….. Date: …………………………………………………. Section B Assessment INTRODUCTION The Subject Assessment Guidelines (AGs) provide extensive notes on assessment. This section draws together important points from the Assessment Guidelines and additional supportive material. Portfolio Guideline writers and lecturers should refer frequently to the Assessment Guidelines, and ensure that their practices comply with all prescriptions in the AGs 6. DEFINITION OF ASSESSMENT Assessment is the process of gathering relevant evidence to make a judgment against agreed criteria, about what a student knows, understands and can do. A variety of assessment methods may be used. The outcomes of assessments, including internal continuous assessments (ICASS) and external examinations, contribute towards the achievement of a qualification. 7. PURPOSE OF ASSESSMENT Assessment provides a means of monitoring students’ performance and progress and providing feedback, and diagnosing or remediating problems or difficulties in learning. In addition, the process of assessment gives lecturers the opportunity to gauge the effectiveness of their teaching. The ultimate purpose of assessment is to measure learning outcomes. An additional purpose is improvement of teaching, the curriculum and conditions of students’ learning. As the educative enterprise strives to prepare students to be good citizens and workers of the future, the emphasis is increasingly on continuous assessment, as a means to improving teaching and learning. In keeping with the principles of the NQF, assessment serves to: • determine whether the outcomes have been attained; • provide insight into the learning patterns and thinking strategies of the student; determine whether the learning required for the achievement of the exit level outcomes and assessment standards is taking place and whether any difficulties are being experienced; • report to the students, parents and other role-players and stakeholders on the levels of achievement during the learning process and to build a profile of the students’ achievement across the curriculum; • promote students’ acquisition of the knowledge, skills, attitudes and values defined in the national curriculum policy documents; • provide information for the evaluation and review of learning programmes used in the classroom; and • assist lecturers in improving their teaching approaches, including methodology, pace, etc. 8. PRINCIPLES OF ASSESSMENT The principles of assessment that are particularly important in the completion of this portfolio of evidence are the following: • Appropriate: the method of assessment is suited to the performance being assessed and the activities in the assessment mirror the conditions of actual performance. • Fair: an assessment should not in hinder or advantage a student in any way, and the process should be clear, transparent and available to students. • Manageable: the methods used makes assessment easy to arrange or manage and are cost effective. • Integrated: Evidence collected is integrated into the work or learning process where appropriate. Valid: refers to measuring what is supposed to be measured; assessment should stay within the parameters of what is required. • Relevant: the evidence is relevant to the NC(V) standard. • Authentic: The evidence is attributable to the person being assessed. • Sufficient: The evidence confirms that all criteria have been met and that performance against the standards can be achieved consistently. • Systematic: The process is sufficiently rigorous to ensure fairness. • Open: Students can contribute to the panning and collection of evidence. • Consistent: The same judgments should be made in similar context, each time an assessment is made for a specific purpose. Effective assessment is underpinned by the following principles: • The purpose of assessment should be made explicit. • A criterion-referenced approach will prevail with elements of norm referencing to be taken into account at systemic level. • Assessment must be authentic, continuous, multi-dimensional, varied and balanced. • Assessment must be an on-going integral part of the learning process. • It must be accurate, objective, valid, fair, practicable, effective, time-efficient and reliable. • Assessment must gather information from several contexts and use a variety of methods according to what is being assessed and the needs of the student. The methods and techniques used must be appropriate to the knowledge, skills, or attitudes to be assessed, as well as to the age and developmental level of the student. • It must be free of bias and sensitive to gender, race, cultural background and abilities. • Feedback to students, parents and other relevant persons must be an integral part of the assessment process. • Assessment results must be communicated clearly, accurately, timeously and meaningfully. • Assessment must serve a diagnostic role so that it could be used to identify areas where students need support and remedial intervention. • Support to students who experience barriers to learning must be an integral part of assessment. 9. TYPES OF ASSESSMENT The Assessment Guidelines identify four types of assessments: Baseline assessment At the beginning of a level or learning experience, baseline assessment establishes the knowledge, skills, values and attitudes (SKVAs) that students bring to the classroom. This knowledge assists lecturers to plan learning programmes and learning activities. Diagnostic assessment This assessment diagnoses the nature and causes of learning barriers experienced by specific students. It is followed by guidance, appropriate support and intervention strategies. This type of assessment is useful to make referrals for students requiring specialist help. Formative assessment This assessment monitors and supports teaching and learning. It determines student strengths and weaknesses and provides feedback on progress. It determines if a student is ready for summative assessment. Summative assessment This type of assessment gives an overall picture of student progress at a given time. It determines whether the student is sufficiently competent to progress to the next level. 10. FORMS OF ASSESSMENT The assessment activities developed should be based on a variety of forms of assessment to expose students to different types of presentation. Among the possible forms of assessment are the following: • Case studies • Assignments • Practical projects • Performance projects • Investigations or research • Demonstrations • Simulations • Tests • Observations • Oral questioning after observations 11. SCALES OF ACHIEVEMENT After any assessment a report indicates a student’s achievement on predefined Scales of Achievement (see page 9 of Assessment Guidelines). There are different scales of achievement for Fundamental subjects and vocational subjects. Scale of achievement for the Fundamental component |RATING Code |Rating |MARKS (%) | |7 |Outstanding |80 – 100 | |6 |Meritorious |70 – 79 | |5 |Substantial 60 – 69 | |4 |Adequate |50 – 59 | |3 |Moderate |40 – 49 | |2 |Elementary |30 – 39 | |1 |Not achieved |0 – 29 | Scale of Achievement for the Vocational component RATING CODE |RATING |MARKS % | |5 |Outstanding |80-100 | |4 |Highly competent |70-79 | |3 |Competent |50-69 | |2 |Not yet competent |40-49 | |1 |Not achieved |0-39 | 12. RECORDING AND REPORTING ACHIEVEMENTS The Assessment Guidelines provide a discussion of instruments and tools for collecting evidence on pages 7-8. Rubrics, which are particularly useful for qualitative assessment of task based activities, are mentioned amongst these. Rubrics Rubrics are a combination of rating codes and descriptions of standards. They consist of a hierarchy of standards with benchmarks that describe the range of acceptable performance in each code band. Rubrics require lecturers to know exactly what is required by the outcome. Rubrics can be holistic, giving a global picture of the standard required, or analytic, giving a clear picture of the distinct features that make up the criteria, or can combine both. The Learning Programme Guidelines give examples of subject-specific rubrics. To design a rubric, a lecturer has to decide the following: • What Learning Outcomes are being targeted? What Assessment Standards are targeted by the task? • What kind of evidence should be collected? • What are the different parts of the performance that will be assessed? • What different assessment instruments best suit each part of the task (such as the process and the product)? • What knowledge should be evident? • What skills should be applied or actions taken? • What opportunities for expressing personal opinions, values or attitudes arise in performing the task? Which of these should be assessed and how? • Should one rubric target all the Learning Outcomes and Assessment Standards of the task or does the task need several rubrics? How many rubrics are, in fact, needed for the task? Students should be shown the rubrics for the task before they are required to perform the task. The rubric focuses both the learning and the performance and becomes a powerful tool for self-assessment. 13. THE ASSESSMENT PROCESS • The lecturer designs the assessment by selecting the appropriate methods, instruments and designing the appropriate tools. • The lecturer informs the student about the requirements for the assessment • The lecturer reaches an agreement with the student on how the evidence is to be collected and presented • The lecturer explains the roles and responsibilities of the student with regard to the assessment • The lecturer conducts the assessment and collects the evidence The lecturer makes a judgment about the evidence of learning, measured against the pre-defined criteria of the NC(V) standard • The lecturer provides feedback to the student with regard to the assessment decision • The lecturer completes the administration according to established requirements • The lecturer evaluates and reviews the process The student has the right to appeal if not satisfied with the outcome of the assessment and the explanations provided. 14. OUTCOMES BASED ASSESSMENT (OBA) IN THE CONTEXT OF THE NQF AND NCV Outcomes based education can be described as an approach to educating students that requires both the educator and student to focus on two things: Firstly the focus is on the desired end results of each learning process. These desired end results are called the outcomes of learning and students need to demonstrate that they have attained these. Secondly the focus is on the instructive and learning process that guides the students to these results. Lecturers are required to use the learning outcomes as a focus when they make instructional decisions and plan their lessons. An outcome is the demonstration in context of: • A learning experience • Capabilities that derive from and underpin the learning experience. In other words: • The student has an underlying capability • The student has to demonstrate that capability • The student has to demonstrate the capability in a particular context. Evidence of learning must show the following: Students know facts, concepts and other knowledge terms. • Students show insight into the implications and consequences behind those facts. • Students can successfully complete tasks associated with their learning. • Students can draw conclusions, make decisions and make predictions based on what they have learned. Assessment asks three questions; • Do you know it and understand it? • Can you choose and use what you know to solve problems or perform tasks? • Can you use different strategies to show your learning, and can you repeat the demonstration? 15. BARRIERS IN THE ASSESSMENT PROCESS Language barrier A language barrier may be identified by written or verbal questions. To solve this problem a competent interpreter may be used, the terminology applicable to the assessment outcomes should be used, and the written and communication content limited. Motivation barriers The willingness to achieve success indicates the student’s necessary motivation. If the student is not motivated, the advantages of achieving success on any NC(V) standard can be explained in an effort to inspire motivation. Culture barriers Discussions with students about their family backgrounds may indicate cultural barriers. Signs of cultural difference should alert a lecturer to the need to be culturally sensitive across a range of social contexts, and to provide feedback in a culturally sensitive manner. Physical disabilities Students experiencing restricted mobility, visual impairment and any other visual and hearing barriers need to be assessed in circumstances which prevent the disability from affecting appropriate levels of achievement. If however the disability is of such a nature that it would prevent the student from performing adequately he/she must be advised accordingly. Political/Emotional barriers Political and emotional barriers are very similar to cultural differences. Talk to the student but avoid small talk that may be interpreted as negative with respect to political issues. Prevent any action or comment that may trigger political or emotional thoughts. Attitude barriers The old examination method of testing with its accompanying stresses can lead students to develop negative attitudes. Students should be treated with empathy, respect, fairness and understanding without lowering the academic standards. Use Critical Cross-Field Outcomes to overcome barriers Identify and solve problems using critical and creative planning for contingencies. Make proposals to address difficulties. Communicate these with the candidate and work effectively within a team. 16. SAQA’S CRITICAL CROSS-FIELD OUTCOMES • Identify and solve problems using critical and creative thinking. • Work effectively with others in a team. • Organize and manage oneself and one’s activities responsibly and effectively. • Collect, analyze, organize and critically evaluate information. Communicate effectively using visual, mathematical and/or language skills in oral and/or written form. • Using science and technology effectively and critically to show responsibility towards the environment and health of others. • Demonstrate an understanding of the world as a set of related systems and recognize that problem-solving contexts do not exist in isolation. 17. LECTURER ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES • Must assess students’ work continuously • Must alert students to the fact that plagiarism is unacceptable • Give feedback and guidance to students and their other important stakeholders when the learning process has or has not yet given the desired results. Have the ability to judge whether a student’s lack of competence is due to their insufficient ability to incorporate and process knowledge with skills, or whether their knowledge and understanding is established but skills still being developed. • Be able to ascertain whether a student’s lack of competence is due to the student’s own inadequacies, or are attributable to insufficiencies in the organisational culture and climate, the assessment system, or due to insufficient engagement with the NC(V) Standards. • Be aware of own bias and implement compensatory measures. • Must be fully familiar with, and must apply the NC(V) standards. • Must plan and conduct the assessment processes. Must be a subject matter expert with respect to the NC(V) standards against which the student is being assessed. • Must have good interpersonal skills. • The lecturer must apply the guidelines and policies as stipulated by DoE. • Guide and assist with the drawing up of departmental action plan so that the student can attain competence against the relevant NC(V) standards. • Must control, record and take responsibility for the safekeeping of the portfolios, tests and ISAT tasks. 18. STUDENT ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES • The student must provide all evidence necessary to demonstrate competence against the specific NC(V) standards. • The student should accept that if the necessary evidence is not provided, then competency couldn't be accredited. The student must agree to go through all the necessary steps in the assessment process. • The student should bring to the Lecturer’s attention, as early as possible, any impediments against assessing for competency. • The student should advise the lecturer of any misunderstandings or disagreements regarding the assessment process during the initial interview before signing the consent form. • The student should gain full understanding of the NQF, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of assessment, must agree to no unrealistic expectations and accept the findings of the lecturer. Section C ICASS Assessment Activities 19. SUBJECT ASSESSMENT PLAN AND FORMAL SCHEDULE OF ASSESSMENT Term |Assessment Task No |Topics |Completion target |SUBJECT OUTCOMES |ASSESSMENT METHOD |EVIDENCE REQUIRED |Dates |WEIGHTING OF MARKS | | | | | |LEARNING OUTCOMES | | | | | | | | | |ASSESSMENT STANDARDS | | | | | | | | | | | | |Given |Due | | |Term 1 |1 |Topic 1 | |SO 1 |Project |Rubric | | |10% | | | | | |LO1-4 | | | | | | | |2 |Topic 1 | |S0 2 |Assignment |Answer sheet and memo | | |10% | | | | | |LO 1-2 | | | | | | |Term 2 |3 |Topic 1 and 2 | |SO 1-3 |Test 1 |Answer sheet and memo | | |10% | | | | | |LO1-3 | | | | | | | |4 |Topic 3 and4 | SO 1-4 |Role play |Checklist, rubric and e | | |20% | | | | | |LO1-4 | |template of DJ, DAJ, CJ and | | | | | | | | | | |CAJ | | | | | |5 |Topic 1 and4 | |SO 1-3 |Internal exam |Answer sheet and memo | | |20% | | | | | |LO1-3 | | | | | | |Term 3 |6 |Topic 5 and 6 | |SO 1-4 |Test 2 |Answer sheet and memo | | |10% | | | | | |LO1-3 | | | | | | | |7 |Topic 1 to 6 | |SO1-4 |CAT |Checklist, memo and answer | | |20% | | | | | |LO1-4 | |sheet | | | | 20. WORKING MARK SHEET Subject marks must be collated into working mark sheets for each subject. Each college is likely to have developed a prescribed format to be used on all of the campuses. The following is an example of the type of instrument required: |…………….. FET College | | | |………………. Campus | | |Gauteng Department of Education | | | |SUMMARY OF ASSESSMENTS MARKSHEET (PoE) | |Subject: | |Level: | | | | | | | | | | | |Date | |Learning Programme: |Financial management/office administration | |Subject: |Applied Accounting | |Level: 3 |Assessment Task Number 1: Research | |Topics covered: |Topic 1 | |Subject Outcomes and Learning Outcomes: |SO1 | | |LO1-4 | |Integration: | | |Date of issue: |Duration: 3 days | Scale of achievement |RATING CODE |5 |4 |3 |2 |1 | |RATING |Outstanding |Highly competent |Competent |Not yet competent |Not achieved | |MARKS % |80-100 |70-79 |50-69 |40-49 |0-39 | Feedback to student: | | | Signatures |Assessor: |Student: |Moderator: | |Date: |Date: |Date: | Assessment Task 1:Research Topic: 1: Administer income and receipts: SO 1: LO 1-4 Duration: 3 Days MARKS: 50: 10 marks for sorting documents 40 marks for presentation (rubric) Instructions: 1. This assessment is done in a group of 4 to 5 maximum. 2. Students are given a period of 3 days to complete the research 3. Findings of the research to be presented to the whole group. Students must visit at-least two local businesses, big or small, to collect different source documents used by the different businesses visited. A minimum of 4 documents per group must be collected. Sort the documents you have collected and compare source documents from different businesses. Use the A4 paper to list and explain the similarities and the differences in the source documents you have collected. The source documents must be placed onto a poster with the name of the business that uses them. [pic] Cover page for assessment tools Name of assessor: | | |Learning Programme: |Finance ,Economics and Accounting | |Subject: |Applied Accounting | |Level: 3 |Re Assessment | |Integration: | | |Instructions to assessor: | | | |See attached marking guidelines and mark schedule. | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | Assessment Task 1:Rubric |Criteria |5 |4 |3 |2 |1 | | |Outstanding |Very Good |Good |Competent |Not yet Competent | | |(80%-100) |(70%-79%) |(60%-69%) |(50%-59%) |(30%-49) | |Is the message clear? Extremely clear |Very clear |Fairly clear |Reasonably clear |Message poor/ no | | | | | | |message | |Is the message |Extremely effective |Very effective |Quite effective |Not very effective |Not effective at all | |effective? | | | | | | |How eye catching is the|Excellent poster |Very eye catching |Fairly eye catching |Shows signs of |Not eye catching at all| |poster? | | | |creativity | | |Is the message |Choice words used |Very persuasive |Quite persuasive |Not very persuasive |Not persuasive at all | |persuasive ? | | | | | |Is the poster well |Excellently structured |Very well structured |Has a good structure |Show some structure |No structure at all | |structured/ | | | | | | |Does the poster contain|Yes, all the right |Yes, the right |Yes, most of the right |No, does not have all |No, does not contain | |all the right |information is there |information appears on |information is there |the information |any information at all | |information? plus more |the poster | | | | |How appropriate is the |Completely appropriate |Very appropriate |Appropriate |Not very appropriate |Not appropriate at all | |poster for target |for target market | | | |for target market | |market? | | | | | | |Overall impression |Excellent |Very good |Good |Average |Poor | [pic] Cover page for Assessment Tasks Name of student: | | |Learning Programme: |Financial Management/Office Administration | |Subject: |Applied Accounting | |Level: 3 |Assessment Task Number: 2 | |Topics covered: |Topic 1 Administer income and receipts | |Subject Outcomes and Learning Outcomes: |SO 1-2: LO 1-3 | |Total marks: |40 | |Date of issue: |Duration: 1 hour | Scale of achievement |RATING CODE |5 |4 |3 |2 |1 | |RATING |Outstanding |Highly competent |Competent |Not yet competent |Not achieved | |MARKS % |80-100 |70-79 |50-69 |40-49 |0-39 | |Feedback to student: | | | Signatures Assessor: |Student: |Moderator: | |Date: |Date: |Date: | Assessment Task 2 Topic 1 Administer income and receipts: SO 1-2: LO 1-3 Duration: 1 hour MARKS: 40 Instructions: 1. Use the provided answer sheet 2. No correction fluid. 3. The use of non-programmable calculator is permissible 4. Cell-phones cannot be used as calculators 5. Answer ALL questions Question 1 (24marks) In each of the following cases, calculate the amount of input VAT, output VAT and tax receivable from or payable to SARS: NO | | | | | |Amount: |6 000 |00 | |For: rent received | |With thanks | | RECEIPT (Duplicate) No17 | |20/7/08 | | | |Received from: A. Mvela | | | | | | | |Amount: |30 000 |00 | |For: capital contribution | |With thanks | Cash register roll totals: 4 July R8 600 12 July R10 300 19 July R7 900 26 July R13 420 30 July R12 800 | | | | |RECEIPT No. 18 | |26/7/08 | | | |Received from: Mr. S Mall | | | | | | | |Amount: |1 400 |00 | |For: payment of account | |With thanks | Mvela traders deposited money on the 4th, 20th and 30th of July 2008. [pic] Cover page for assessment tools Name of assessor: | | |Learning Programme: |Finance, Economics and Accounting | |Subject: |Applied Accounting | |Level: 3 |Assessment Task Number: 2 | |Integration: | | |Instructions to assessor: | | | |See attached marking guidelines and mark schedule. | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | Assessment Task 2: Memorandum Question 1(24marks) No |Purchase price | |Learning Programme: |Financial Management/Office Administration | |Subject: |Applied Accounting | |Level: 3 |Assessment Task Number 3: Test | |Topics covered: |Topic 1 and 2 | |Subject Outcomes and Learning Outcomes: |SO 1-4: LO 1-3 | |Total marks: |60 | |Date of issue: |Duration 1 hour 30 minutes: | Scale of achievement |RATING CODE |5 |4 |3 |2 |1 | |RATING |Outstanding |Highly competent |Competent |Not yet competent |Not achieved | |MARKS % |80-100 |70-79 |50-69 |40-49 |0-39 | |Feedback to student: | | | Signatures Assessor: |
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