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Competitive Landscape Clothing In The UK Example For Free

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The main event in 2008 has been a precipitous collapse across most of the retail sector, the result of a general economic recession which some predict may even turn into a depression. This has resulted in fairly radical movements in all the main statistical areas, with growth rates plummeting across almost all subsectors, and with market leaders shoring up market share, which they had previously been losing, and with distribution moving more towards cheaper outlets as consumers aim to save money. The precise causes for the negative figures reported are a matter of fairly obvious economic fact: namely, that following a huge amount of lending across the US and the UK, particularly in the American property market, a large scale credit default began in 2007 which affected property prices and the ability of banks to subsidise lending on any credible level. This 'credit crunch' has since infiltrated its way into the 'real' economy which has contracted in the UK in 2008. The upshot has been a decline in disposable income at all levels of the consumer base. Where previously, clothing and footwear has, unlike many other retail sectors, appealed to customers of all income levels, and has been particularly popular with those towards the lower end, now these customers are staying at home out of necessity. The best performing subsector in Clothing is accessories. It is not uncommon for smaller, cheaper goods to thrive in times of recession as consumers still enjoy buying goods but are doing so within a much tighter budget. Accessories rely on impulse buying in many cases, being positioned in stores nearer the counter. The same logic operates as with chocolate in supermarkets. The overall effect on the market has been a consolidation for the main companies across the board, and has been catastrophic for small, independent retailers and start-ups. In terms of products being bought and manufactured, the emphasis has shifted towards mainstream products with items such as shirts, blouses, and tops registering a weaker contraction than suits, trousers, and other high quality products which are less appealing owing to their higher price. Sportswear has stayed fairly resilient to the recession as consumers tend to wear sportswear as leisurewear rather than simply for sporting activities. Also, sportswear is comfortable, a factor that consumers may be attracted to during recessionary times. There is a small continuation of the trend of the last five years where casualwear has been growing relative to formalwear. This is caused more by wide-scale demographic changes and changes in attitudes at the workplace, as well as the increased buying power of the youth market. This is such an entrenched trend that it is unlikely to see any change in spite of macroeconomic volatility. Unit prices have been continuing to fall for so long now that it is almost inevitable that this crisis will see the unit price reach its natural low. This did not arrive in 2007 or 2008 however as for the most part retailers and suppliers were able to cut prices due to the continuing strength of the pound. As the economic forecasts began to get worse, it was the first response of many of the high street brands to slash prices even further in a bid to gain more custom. This strategy has not worked, however, and once the pound fell sharply in value at the end of 2008 it became far more likely that prices will start to rise soon. In line with increases in private label share, there is a notable increase in distribution measures for grocery retailers up from 10.5% in 2007 to 10.8% in 2008. This trend has been ongoing since grocery retailers are relatively new entrants to the market and are posing a greater threat to the high street. Concomitant losses in non-grocery stores are reflected in both mixed retailers and clothing and footwear specialists although the latter remain dominant with a 62.8% share of the market overall. In general, these movements reflect changes in consumer attitudes to shopping, preferences for lower prices, and centralised shopping. The same reasons lie behind the slight increase in distribution share for internet retail up from 5.3% in 2007 to 6.3% a year on for clothing and footwear.

Competitive Landscape

The leading brands in 2007 and 2008 remain Marks & Spencer and Next. They are followed closely by Arcadia and Tesco. The largest growers in this sector were indeed Primark and Tesco. Primark registered massive market share growth in one year, an anomalously large figure aided in part by the collapse of Woolworths and Adams, both of whom were strong competitors of Primark. Primark now occupies around 3.9% market share for clothing, placing it fourth in ranking. It should be self-evident that Primark's success in 2008 is also attributable to a large rise in budget clothes shopping as consumers care more than ever about prices and less about quality, or fashion concerns. Primark's exceptional performance has been slowly stirring over the last four or five years and has capitalised on the huge expansion of the market at both ends. Primark carved a very distinctive niche for itself as a budget retailer using unbelievably low manufacturing costs as a means of squeezing margins. By appealing so simply to this basic consumer demand, they have managed to open up a large lead over other high street brands. At the same time, Primark has benefited from, and contributed to, the move in consumer demand towards less quality, more disposable goods with shorter replacement cycles. Tesco's strong performance, and to a lesser extent Asda which recorded positive growth in 2008, reflects a number of different factors many of which were already in motion before the recent economic changes. Customers have been centralising their shopping and are far more willing to use grocery stores to do basic clothes shopping. In turn, these stores have re-strategised to respond to demand, opening more out-of-town superstores modelled on the European and American hypermarket model. Here clothes represent a far larger proportion of overall floor space. Perhaps more surprising, given these gains lower down the market, is the continued strength of the principal market leaders. Marks & Spencer have managed to keep hold of their overall market share thanks to a cautious sales policy aimed at appealing to the middle-bracket consumer who is no doubt concerned about the economy and therefore doesn't want to spend too much, but still values quality and style issues and may not wish to buy in Primark for that reason. This is a difficult strategy to pursue efficiently and it has somewhat forced on the company by the situation. The economic crisis has been most grave for independent retailers. There have been many reports of losses and closures on the high street particularly among boutique designers, freelancers and gentlemen's tailors. All three had been facing stiff competition in any case in the previous years, but now that they have less access to ready money from the banks, and with weaker capital positions than the big players, it is inevitable that there has been a lot of grief in this sector. Of course, most notably in this sector has been the loss of a large number of clothing specialists. Jumpers, Woolworths, and Adams are but the three biggest high street clothing specialists to have lost out as well as the impending collapse of Icelandic firm Baugur which owns a dominant stake in House of Fraser. At the time of writing the future of Baugur is still being decided although it looks as though House of Fraser will be subject to a takeover which may leave the brand name intact.

Prospects

Clothing is forecast to continue to fall in growth on average until 2011. The bulk of the dip is forecast to occur in the next two years with the following three seeing an upturn and an eventual return to positive growth and prosperity. The most important factor in the recovery of the clothing sector will be the recovery of the economy as a whole. There is very little individual companies can do at this time to give clothing and footwear any more of a boost. Companies must sit tight and wait for consumer confidence to return which is only likely to occur when consumers are no longer worried about potentially losing their jobs or having their wages cut. The general consensus is that the first sign of returning consumer confidence will be in the property market. Forecasts at the moment suggest that there will be no upturn in house prices until the middle of 2010 at the earliest. The recession itself, as in the national decline in trade, is also forecast to last until that point in spite of misleadingly optimistic estimates published by the government at the end of 2008. Since then, it has been seen that the global picture is worse than had previously been expected. The UK Government is doing what it can to try to free up more liquidity in the economy. The recent part-nationalisation of two of the biggest banks means that there is likely to be far more lending to companies which should allow companies to focus more on appealing directly to consumers to come into the store. It is unlikely however that clothing is going to see particular benefits from this. Those companies appealing for more cash from the bank are more likely to be those independent retailers who are struggling at the moment. As has been discussed, the recession has not actually impacted individual companies' market share all that much with the big high street brands retaining strength throughout. Although some of these, such as House of Fraser, currently have very uncertain futures owing to the intricacies of their corporate structure, it is notable that brand share remains roughly stable which suggests consumers are resorting to trusted brands at this time. This is a trend that is likely to continue, the effect being that although the sector is losing ground, most of the top ranking companies are fighting the same battles on, more of less, equal territory. The only sector which continues to perform strongly throughout the forecast period is accessories. It has already been discussed in some detail regarding their success in 2008 which is forecast to continue into the forthcoming years. Infant clothing will remain fairly steady and has an intrinsic strength of a different nature. Parents are more likely to continue investing in their children's clothing and comfort than they are to invest in their own. One other factor which is likely to have a significant impact on the sector in the future is the direction of unit prices. As of early 2009, the pound is currently at an all-time low against the euro and a 10-year low against the dollar. Although the dollar is still an uncertain currency in the long term given the enormous level of debt currently being accrued by the US Government, for the time being it is proving to be more popular than the pound. This is seriously impacting on the buying power of UK companies. Many of the price cuts of previous years have been sustained through the strength of sterling. With this change, and with companies no longer able to afford losses and with consumers seemingly less impressed by price cuts than ever, it is very likely that prices will start to stabilise and increase towards the end of the review period. Further to this, the Bank of England's decision to allow quantitative easing means that there is likely to be far greater inflationary pressure in the coming three or four years. Much of this is entirely out of the hands of the clothing sector, but should inflation be allowed to rise too fast then clearly price cuts will be unsustainable in the long-term. There is likely to be greatly increased merger and acquisition activity as brands are no longer able to cope with the decline in the market. Already the collapse of investment giant Baugur has meant that House of Fraser is being offered for sale and potential bidders include Topshop. It is also the case, however, that failed brands may not get picked up easily as was the case with Woolworths, whose long efforts to find a buyer yielded nothing.

New Product Developments

Summary 1 New Product Launches 2007- 2008 Brand name Company USPs Launch date M&S Suit Marks & Spencer Cheapest ever: £24 Summer 2007 Credit crunch suit package Moss Bros Suit, shirt and tie for cheap: £9 Summer 2008 Little black credit crunch coats Asda Wool raincoat for cheap: £15 October 2008 Coremetrics trouser fit Boden 160% more elastic Spring 2007 Source: Trade press, company research, trade interviews Note: USP = unique selling point

Sector Data

Table 1 Sales of Clothing by Subsector: Volume 2003-2008 mn units 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 Men's tops 89.9 98.6 105.2 114.8 121.1 119.6 Men's shirts 164.6 181.8 195.7 215.3 226.5 228.3 Men's jumpers 142.2 152.6 159.7 170.7 174.3 171.0 Men's shorts and trousers 81.5 88.0 92.6 99.6 102.7 102.2 Men's suits 6.8 7.2 7.4 7.8 7.8 7.5 Men's jackets and coats 11.0 11.8 12.5 13.4 14.0 14.0 Other men's outerwear 14.0 14.3 14.7 15.0 15.2 15.3 Men's outerwear 510.0 554.3 587.8 636.6 661.6 658.0 Women's tops 126.2 140.7 151.6 168.5 178.2 180.5 Women's shirts and 165.4 183.6 197.2 218.2 229.8 232.7 blouses Women's jumpers 33.1 35.8 37.3 40.3 42.0 42.4 Women's dresses and 39.1 42.7 45.0 49.0 50.5 50.2 skirts Women's shorts and 134.4 147.4 156.0 170.2 177.4 176.7 trousers Women's suits 10.5 11.2 11.5 12.2 12.4 12.1 Women's jackets and coats 10.8 11.6 12.1 13.0 13.5 13.6 Other women's outerwear 14.1 14.1 14.3 14.4 14.5 14.6 Women's outerwear 533.5 587.1 625.2 685.7 718.4 722.8 Infant clothing 74.7 81.6 87.1 94.6 99.9 102.3 Girls' clothing 92.3 100.6 108.0 117.3 121.2 122.6 Boys' clothing 121.3 132.0 141.2 153.3 158.0 158.6 Childrenswear 288.2 314.1 336.2 365.2 379.1 383.4 Underwear and nightwear 244.2 255.8 275.7 297.1 307.5 311.0 Socks, stockings and 109.8 115.8 124.4 134.5 141.6 145.0 tights Clothing accessories 57.7 61.5 66.4 73.0 78.5 81.9 Clothing 1,743.4 1,888.5 2,015.6 2,192.3 2,286.6 2,302.2 Source: Official statistics, trade associations, trade press, company research, trade interviews, Euromonitor International estimates Table 2 Sales of Clothing by Subsector: Value 2003-2008 £ million 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 Men's tops 1,401.9 1,459.4 1,479.7 1,534.4 1,537.3 1,442.3 Men's shirts 2,331.8 2,446.6 2,503.0 2,616.0 2,690.4 2,654.4 Men's jumpers 2,518.4 2,621.5 2,660.8 2,759.1 2,782.9 2,695.9 Men's shorts and trousers 1,154.5 1,209.1 1,234.6 1,287.9 1,301.1 1,271.8 Men's suits 582.7 606.6 615.7 638.4 633.1 608.2 Men's jackets and coats 465.9 488.4 499.2 521.2 528.0 519.5 Other men's outerwear 238.6 236.6 235.0 232.5 230.0 227.6 Men's outerwear 8,693.9 9,068.1 9,228.0 9,589.4 9,702.8 9,419.8 Women's tops 2,681.9 2,840.3 2,908.8 3,069.8 3,140.7 3,100.4 Women's shirts and 2,929.1 3,089.8 3,152.0 3,313.3 3,374.0 3,314.1 blouses Women's jumpers 702.9 737.6 746.9 780.9 795.4 789.0 Women's dresses and 1,109.3 1,173.7 1,200.9 1,266.1 1,274.6 1,241.7 skirts Women's shorts and 1,903.8 2,025.8 2,080.4 2,201.6 2,236.7 2,183.8 trousers Women's suits 874.1 919.2 934.8 979.5 986.5 953.8 Women's jackets and coats 496.9 519.1 524.5 545.9 553.8 547.1 Other women's outerwear 250.0 242.4 238.3 233.4 229.8 227.4 Women's outerwear 10,948.0 11,548.0 11,786.4 12,390.5 12,591.5 12,357.3 Infant clothing 1,057.9 1,097.7 1,113.9 1,149.6 1,173.6 1,174.7 Girls' clothing 1,949.2 2,018.0 2,057.7 2,123.6 2,122.3 2,088.1 Boys' clothing 1,890.5 1,954.6 1,985.5 2,049.1 2,041.1 1,992.1 Childrenswear 4,897.6 5,070.4 5,157.1 5,322.3 5,337.0 5,255.0 Underwear and nightwear 2,681.3 2,668.0 2,732.3 2,797.6 2,765.2 2,678.8 Socks, stockings and 894.3 895.9 914.9 939.5 956.6 952.2 tights Clothing accessories 735.2 745.2 764.0 798.5 829.7 842.2 Clothing 28,850.2 29,995.7 30,582.6 31,837.9 32,182.8 31,505.2 Source: Official statistics, trade associations, trade press, company research, trade interviews, Euromonitor International estimates Table 3 Sales of Clothing by Subsector: % Volume Growth 2003-2008 % volume growth 2007/08 2003-08 CAGR 2003/08 TOTAL Men's tops -1.2 5.9 33.0 Men's shirts 0.8 6.8 38.7 Men's jumpers -1.9 3.8 20.3 Men's shorts and trousers -0.5 4.6 25.4 Men's suits -3.0 2.0 10.5 Men's jackets and coats 0.4 5.0 27.9 Other men's outerwear 1.0 1.8 9.4 Men's outerwear -0.5 5.2 29.0 Women's tops 1.2 7.4 43.0 Women's shirts and blouses 1.3 7.1 40.7 Women's jumpers 1.0 5.1 28.2 Women's dresses and skirts -0.6 5.1 28.4 Women's shorts and trousers -0.4 5.6 31.5 Women's suits -2.5 2.9 15.1 Women's jackets and coats 0.8 4.8 26.3 Other women's outerwear 0.7 0.7 3.7 Women's outerwear 0.6 6.3 35.5 Infant clothing 2.4 6.5 37.0 Girls' clothing 1.1 5.8 32.8 Boys' clothing 0.4 5.5 30.8 Childrenswear 1.1 5.9 33.0 Underwear and nightwear 1.1 5.0 27.4 Socks, stockings and tights 2.4 5.7 32.1 Clothing accessories 4.4 7.3 42.1 Clothing 0.7 5.7 32.1 Source: Official statistics, trade associations, trade press, company research, trade interviews, Euromonitor International estimates Table 4 Sales of Clothing by Subsector: % Value Growth 2003-2008 % current value growth 2007/08 2003-08 CAGR 2003/08 TOTAL Men's tops -6.2 0.6 2.9 Men's shirts -1.3 2.6 13.8 Men's jumpers -3.1 1.4 7.0 Men's shorts and trousers -2.3 2.0 10.2 Men's suits -3.9 0.9 4.4 Men's jackets and coats -1.6 2.2 11.5 Other men's outerwear -1.0 -0.9 -4.6 Men's outerwear -2.9 1.6 8.4 Women's tops -1.3 2.9 15.6 Women's shirts and blouses -1.8 2.5 13.1 Women's jumpers -0.8 2.3 12.2 Women's dresses and skirts -2.6 2.3 11.9 Women's shorts and trousers -2.4 2.8 14.7 Women's suits -3.3 1.8 9.1 Women's jackets and coats -1.2 1.9 10.1 Other women's outerwear -1.0 -1.9 -9.0 Women's outerwear -1.9 2.5 12.9 Infant clothing 0.1 2.1 11.0 Girls' clothing -1.6 1.4 7.1 Boys' clothing -2.4 1.1 5.4 Childrenswear -1.5 1.4 7.3 Underwear and nightwear -3.1 0.0 -0.1 Socks, stockings and tights -0.5 1.3 6.5 Clothing accessories 1.5 2.8 14.6 Clothing -2.1 1.8 9.2 Source: Official statistics, trade associations, trade press, company research, trade interviews, Euromonitor International estimates Table 5 Sales of Men's Outerwear by Type 2003-2008 % units 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 Casual 43.7 44.3 44.8 45.2 45.8 46.2 Formal 42.2 41.5 40.7 39.8 39.2 38.7 Sports 14.1 14.3 14.5 14.9 15.0 15.1 Total 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 Source: Official statistics, trade associations, trade press, company research, store checks, trade interviews, Euromonitor International estimates Table 6 Sales of Women's Outerwear by Type 2003-2008 % units 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 Casual 46.5 47.1 47.6 48.1 48.5 49.0 Formal 41.4 40.6 39.8 38.9 38.4 38.0 Sports 12.0 12.3 12.5 12.9 13.1 13.0 Total 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 Source: Official statistics, trade associations, trade press, company research, store checks, trade interviews, Euromonitor International estimates Table 7 Sales of Childrenswear by Type 2003-2008 % units 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 Casual 69.2 69.5 69.6 69.8 70.6 70.8 Formal 18.1 17.7 17.4 17.2 16.3 16.0 Sports 12.8 12.9 13.0 13.0 13.1 13.2 Total 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 Source: Official statistics, trade associations, trade press, company research, store checks, trade interviews, Euromonitor International estimates Table 8 Clothing Company Shares 2004-2008 % retail value rsp Company 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 Marks & Spencer Plc 9.6 9.3 9.3 9.2 9.1 Next Plc 6.2 6.4 6.6 6.7 6.8 Arcadia Group Ltd 4.4 4.5 4.5 4.6 4.7 Primark Stores Ltd 2.3 2.5 2.9 3.3 3.9 Tesco Plc 2.6 2.8 2.9 3.3 3.8 Matalan Ltd 3.4 3.4 3.3 3.4 3.6 Asda Stores Ltd 2.0 2.1 2.1 2.2 2.4 New Look Retailers Ltd 2.2 2.2 2.2 2.3 2.4 Gap Inc, The 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.7 Peacock Group Plc, The 1.6 1.6 1.6 1.6 1.5 River Island Clothing Ltd 1.4 1.4 1.4 1.4 1.5 Hennes & Mauritz (H&M) 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.9 Ltd INDITEX - Industria de 0.7 0.7 0.8 0.8 0.8 Diseño Textil Baugur UK Ltd 0.6 0.7 0.7 0.8 0.8 Mothercare Plc 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7 BhS Ltd 0.7 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.7 Hennes & Mauritz (H&M) AB 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 Monsoon Ltd 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 French Connection Group 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 Plc Debenhams Retail Plc 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 Triumph International Ltd 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 Abercrombie & Fitch Co - - - 0.1 0.1 Jockey UK Co Ltd 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 Hillingdon 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 International Ltd Woolworths Group Plc 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 - Adams Childrenswear Ltd 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 - Private Label 19.8 20.8 21.8 23.0 24.7 Others 36.7 35.2 33.4 31.0 28.2 Total 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 Source: Trade associations, trade press, company research, trade interviews, Euromonitor International estimates Table 9 Clothing Brand Shares 2005-2008 % retail value rsp Brand Company 2005 2006 2007 2008 Marks & Spencer Marks & Spencer Plc 9.3 9.3 9.2 9.1 Next Next Plc 6.4 6.6 6.7 6.8 Tesco Tesco Plc 2.8 2.9 3.3 3.8 Matalan Matalan Ltd 3.4 3.3 3.4 3.6 Primark Primark Stores Ltd 2.0 2.3 2.7 3.3 George Asda Stores Ltd 2.1 2.1 2.2 2.4 New Look New Look Retailers Ltd 2.2 2.2 2.3 2.4 Peacocks Peacock Group Plc, The 1.6 1.6 1.6 1.5 River Island River Island Clothing Ltd 1.4 1.4 1.4 1.5 Gap Gap Inc, The 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 Dorothy Perkins Arcadia Group Ltd 0.9 0.9 0.9 0.9 H&M Hennes & Mauritz (H&M) Ltd 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.9 Zara INDITEX - Industria de 0.7 0.8 0.8 0.8 Diseño Textil Mothercare Mothercare Plc 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7 BHS BhS Ltd 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.7 Topman Arcadia Group Ltd 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7 Burton's Arcadia Group Ltd 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7 Evans Arcadia Group Ltd 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.7 Topshop Arcadia Group Ltd 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 Littlewoods Primark Stores Ltd 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.6 Mosaic Fashions Baugur UK Ltd 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.6 H&M Hennes & Mauritz (H&M) AB 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 Outfit Arcadia Group Ltd 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 Miss Selfridge Arcadia Group Ltd 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 Accessorize Monsoon Ltd 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 FCUK French Connection Group 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 Plc Debenhams Debenhams Retail Plc 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 Banana Republic Gap Inc, The - - - 0.2 Triumph Triumph International Ltd 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 MK Baugur UK Ltd 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 Wallis Arcadia Group Ltd 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 Abercrombie & Fitch Abercrombie & Fitch Co - - 0.1 0.1 Jockey Jockey UK Co Ltd 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 Jane Norman Arcadia Group Ltd 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 Aextex Hillingdon 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 International Ltd Woolworths Woolworths Group Plc 0.6 0.6 0.6 - Adams Kids Adams Childrenswear Ltd 0.5 0.5 0.5 - Private label Private Label 20.8 21.8 23.0 24.7 Others 35.2 33.5 31.0 28.3 Total 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 Source: Trade associations, trade press, company research, trade interviews, Euromonitor International estimates Table 10 Sales of Clothing by Distribution Format: % Analysis 2003-2008 % retail value rsp 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 Store-Based Retailing 86.8 86.3 85.6 86.0 85.0 84.1 Grocery Retailers 7.8 8.6 9.4 10.2 10.5 10.8 Non-Grocery Retailers 78.9 77.7 76.2 75.7 74.5 73.3 Mixed Retailers 11.0 10.5 9.9 9.4 9.2 9.0 Clothing and footwear 66.5 65.6 64.3 63.9 63.5 62.6 specialist retailers Other Non-Grocery 1.5 1.6 2.0 2.5 1.8 1.7 Retailers Non-Store Retailing 13.3 13.7 14.4 14.0 15.0 15.9 Homeshopping 10.4 10.3 10.4 9.6 9.5 9.4 Internet Retailing 2.5 3.1 3.8 4.2 5.3 6.3 Direct Selling 0.4 0.3 0.3 0.2 0.2 0.2 Total 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 Source: Official statistics, trade associations, trade press, company research, store checks, trade interviews, Euromonitor International estimates Table 11 Forecast Sales of Clothing by Subsector: Volume 2008-2013 mn units 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 Men's tops 119.6 116.5 114.4 113.4 114.4 115.7 Men's shirts 228.3 223.2 220.7 221.7 223.9 228.4 Men's jumpers 171.0 166.3 163.7 164.4 165.8 167.5 Men's shorts and trousers 102.2 99.5 98.3 98.1 98.6 99.4 Men's suits 7.5 7.3 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.2 Men's jackets and coats 14.0 13.8 13.6 13.6 13.7 13.8 Other men's outerwear 15.3 15.3 15.6 15.6 15.7 15.7 Men's outerwear 658.0 642.0 633.5 633.9 639.1 647.6 Women's tops 180.5 177.4 175.4 175.0 175.8 177.6 Women's shirts and 232.7 226.6 223.9 222.2 224.2 227.0 blouses Women's jumpers 42.4 41.5 41.0 40.9 41.3 41.8 Women's dresses and 50.2 49.3 48.7 48.4 48.5 49.1 skirts Women's shorts and 176.7 174.6 172.8 171.7 172.2 174.2 trousers Women's suits 12.1 11.6 11.3 11.3 11.3 11.4 Women's jackets and coats 13.6 13.4 13.3 13.2 13.3 13.5 Other women's outerwear 14.6 14.8 14.9 14.9 15.0 14.9 Women's outerwear 722.8 709.1 701.3 697.7 701.7 709.6 Infant clothing 102.3 102.6 103.1 104.0 105.1 106.9 Girls' clothing 122.6 122.0 122.4 123.4 124.9 127.2 Boys' clothing 158.6 157.3 156.9 157.8 159.4 161.4 Childrenswear 383.4 381.9 382.4 385.2 389.5 395.5 Underwear and nightwear 311.0 312.5 319.5 329.5 341.7 355.8 Socks, stockings and 145.0 145.5 146.8 148.3 151.5 156.0 tights Clothing accessories 81.9 83.8 85.8 88.5 91.8 95.5 Clothing 2,302.2 2,274.7 2,269.3 2,283.0 2,315.3 2,359.9 Source: Official statistics, trade associations, trade press, company research, trade interviews, Euromonitor International estimates Table 12 Forecast Sales of Clothing by Subsector: Value 2008-2013 £ million 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 Men's tops 1,442.3 1,334.7 1,267.4 1,232.1 1,231.3 1,246.7 Men's shirts 2,654.4 2,541.0 2,462.0 2,428.8 2,416.6 2,437.1 Men's jumpers 2,695.9 2,592.6 2,527.2 2,516.8 2,521.9 2,534.9 Men's shorts and trousers 1,271.8 1,220.3 1,189.1 1,173.9 1,167.6 1,168.6 Men's suits 608.2 583.2 567.8 562.2 561.1 562.5 Men's jackets and coats 519.5 503.6 491.0 483.6 481.4 482.5 Other men's outerwear 227.6 223.4 223.4 221.9 220.7 219.9 Men's outerwear 9,419.8 8,998.8 8,728.1 8,619.3 8,600.5 8,652.1 Women's tops 3,100.4 2,986.8 2,902.2 2,851.5 2,830.6 2,831.1 Women's shirts and 3,314.1 3,147.5 3,046.6 2,978.4 2,969.2 2,985.2 blouses Women's jumpers 789.0 760.7 743.2 734.7 736.6 742.1 Women's dresses and 1,241.7 1,197.0 1,166.7 1,147.2 1,142.9 1,151.3 skirts Women's shorts and 2,183.8 2,120.7 2,069.9 2,032.0 2,017.5 2,024.2 trousers Women's suits 953.8 909.8 883.2 876.0 873.9 879.3 Women's jackets and coats 547.1 529.4 517.8 511.4 511.2 513.5 Other women's outerwear 227.4 226.2 225.6 225.4 225.5 225.8 Women's outerwear 12,357.3 11,878.2 11,555.3 11,356.7 11,307.4 11,352.5 Infant clothing 1,174.7 1,158.2 1,148.5 1,144.9 1,149.9 1,164.4 Girls' clothing 2,088.1 2,035.1 2,008.9 2,002.7 2,011.5 2,037.5 Boys' clothing 1,992.1 1,934.3 1,896.6 1,882.8 1,884.7 1,896.6 Childrenswear 5,255.0 5,127.5 5,054.0 5,030.5 5,046.1 5,098.5 Underwear and nightwear 2,678.8 2,602.8 2,613.5 2,660.2 2,731.1 2,829.1 Socks, stockings and 952.2 934.4 925.8 922.0 930.8 948.4 tights Clothing accessories 842.2 843.1 848.2 860.7 880.1 906.2 Clothing 31,505.2 30,384.8 29,724.8 29,449.5 29,495.9 29,786.8 Source: Official statistics, trade associations, trade press, company research, trade interviews, Euromonitor International estimates Table 13 Forecast Sales of Clothing by Subsector: % Volume Growth 2008-2013 % volume growth 2008-13 CAGR 2008/13 TOTAL Men's tops -0.7 -3.3 Men's shirts 0.0 0.0 Men's jumpers -0.4 -2.1 Men's shorts and trousers -0.5 -2.7 Men's suits -1.0 -5.1 Men's jackets and coats -0.3 -1.5 Other men's outerwear 0.4 2.0 Men's outerwear -0.3 -1.6 Women's tops -0.3 -1.6 Women's shirts and blouses -0.5 -2.4 Women's jumpers -0.3 -1.3 Women's dresses and skirts -0.4 -2.2 Women's shorts and trousers -0.3 -1.4 Women's suits -1.2 -5.7 Women's jackets and coats -0.2 -1.1 Other women's outerwear 0.4 2.0 Women's outerwear -0.4 -1.8 Infant clothing 0.9 4.5 Girls' clothing 0.7 3.8 Boys' clothing 0.3 1.8 Childrenswear 0.6 3.1 Underwear and nightwear 2.7 14.4 Socks, stockings and tights 1.5 7.5 Clothing accessories 3.1 16.6 Clothing 0.5 2.5 Source: Official statistics, trade associations, trade press, company research, trade interviews, Euromonitor International estimates Table 14 Forecast Sales of Clothing by Subsector: % Value Growth 2008-2013 % constant value growth 2008-13 CAGR 2008/13 TOTAL Men's tops -2.9 -13.6 Men's shirts -1.7 -8.2 Men's jumpers -1.2 -6.0 Men's shorts and trousers -1.7 -8.1 Men's suits -1.6 -7.5 Men's jackets and coats -1.5 -7.1 Other men's outerwear -0.7 -3.4 Men's outerwear -1.7 -8.2 Women's tops -1.8 -8.7 Women's shirts and blouses -2.1 -9.9 Women's jumpers -1.2 -5.9 Women's dresses and skirts -1.5 -7.3 Women's shorts and trousers -1.5 -7.3 Women's suits -1.6 -7.8 Women's jackets and coats -1.3 -6.1 Other women's outerwear -0.1 -0.7 Women's outerwear -1.7 -8.1 Infant clothing -0.2 -0.9 Girls' clothing -0.5 -2.4 Boys' clothing -1.0 -4.8 Childrenswear -0.6 -3.0 Underwear and nightwear 1.1 5.6 Socks, stockings and tights -0.1 -0.4 Clothing accessories 1.5 7.6 Clothing -1.1 -5.5 Source: Official statistics, trade associations, trade press, company research, trade interviews, Euromonitor International estimates
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